Welcome to Scrum Club

Welcome to Scrum Club

The first rule of Scrum Club is: You do not sit during Scrum Club.

Scrum is a pretty effective form of project management, when implemented effectively,
which has found a niche among developers. It has to be implemented correctly
to realize it’s benefits.

When Scrum is implemented the application development team meets once a day and
each individual is allowed to provide a transparent update of their progress.
It’s best if this meeting is short. Allocate one minute for each person.
People are not required to use the entire minute, however they shouldn’t exceed it either.
Sometimes people will have no updates. That is fine. Now the crux.

We don’t sit during Scrum Club because it costs development time. It seems trivial,
so allow me to illustrate from a recent personal experience while contracting as a
Web Developer. Ten people in a scrum meeting, so the meeting should only take
ten minutes right, wrong! It takes forty five minutes. The meeting minutes are
spilling into development time! The meeting is exceeding it’s limit by 450% every day!
Every week! Every month!

We don’t sit during the scrum meeting because it promotes long scrum meetings.
People are generally averse to standing for long periods of time, and if everyone
stands during the meeting it will expedite the meeting in a succint fashion.

What does this look like after a month?

-35 (minute overage) X 5 (days a week) X 4 (weeks) = -700 (minutes lost)

That’s over ten hours a month!

It gets worse. There are nine other people in the room.

That’s, in excess of, one hundred hours every month.

Laziness is costing your team, at least, one hundred hours every month.

Do your team a favor and don’t sit during scrum meetings.

It’s just one of those counter intuitive things that works out.